Tuesday, 24 December 2013

The Chain Pier, Two Bales and Exit Road

"The Chain Pier" :- A very rare sight on Brighton beach as there needs to be a severely low tide for the remains of these old oak posts (sunk ten feet into the bedrock) to be exposed. Even when they are on view many pass them by without giving them a second thought or glance but I know exactly what they are and their history. These are the foundation remains of one of the pylons that once supported The Royal Suspension Chain Pier in Brighton. It was designed by Captain Samuel Brown rn and built in 1823 and was the first major pier to be built in Brighton, England. It was built as a landing stage for packet boats going to Dieppe on the coast of France. There were also a small number of attractions on it one of which was a camera obscura. Both Turner and Constable made paintings of the pier and King William IV once landed on it. The Chain Pier was eventually destroyed by a severe storm on 4th December 1896.



"Two Bales" :- Down on the farm. Well ... walking past it actually as this is the route I sometimes take when walking into Brighton from the village of Ovingdean on the south coast of England. Once you turn off from the main village road there's a wide unmade road for the first part of the walk which then turns into a dirt track. It passes right by part of the village farm so the journey is suddenly filled with the sights, sounds and smells of rural life. This is a shot of the side of the huge cowshed.



"Exit Road" :- No prizes for guessing where I was when I took this shot. I thought i'd do something different from "the norm" by turning my back on the sea, boats and marina village and concentrating on a shot of the huge raised entrance and exit roads of the marina. The higher of the two (with "Brighton Marina" painted on its side) is the entrance road, the lower is the exit road that goes into and through the wall. I was standing on the upper most level of the multi-storey car park looking North to get this shot.



All Photography Copyright © Justin Hill