Thursday, 16 April 2015

Fading Front, Well Earned Rest and Thirties Portal

Fading Front :- This was shot just a few days ago on the 13th April 2015 (Monday) during a very heavy sea mist that had rolled in from the English Channel and was smothering Brighton's famous seafront. In this image you can see the beautiful Brighton Bandstand (known as 'The Birdcage') which was designed by Phillip Lockwood and opened in 1884. As I stood there in the damp air on the promenade it suddenly struck me just how unchanged this area is. Stick a few people in Crinoline dresses, bonnets, frock coats and top hats and you'd be hard pushed to guess the year. This then lead me to another train of thought which was wondering just how the 1800's did actually look in colour. We only ever see the odd black and white image and base out knowledge on the architecture and clothes that have managed to survive. On this particular day it was hard to see anything more than a few hundred yeards away as the mist was swallowing everything in its path!



Well Earned Rest :- A black and white image of sundown as seen from the beach in Hove. There's a very different feel and look to everything once you cross from brighton into Hove. WEven the beach takes on a different look and feel. The old Victorian railings are of a different design, the breakwaters aren't the same either. Hove has its own identity which is quite surprsing when you think that apart from a man made border Brighton and Hove simply run into each other. There's a somewhat dreamy quality about this image that I find difficult to put my finger on.



Thirties Portal :- A bright and sunny promenade in Saltdean which is just a few miles East of the city of Brighton. Much of Saltdean village is 1930's built and it's well known for several buildings which were built in an Art Deco / Streamline Modern style. The subway that passes between Saltdean Lido (built in 1938) and the beach has a very 1930's entrance to it. The brickwork is reminiscent of some othe old 1930's tiled fireplace surrounds that I've seen. It's huge, very square and imposing but still retains a certain elegance about it that no longer seems to be required when architects design anything new. The subway was actually built four years before the Lido and was part of a road widening scheme.



All Photography Copyright © Justin Hill