Wednesday, 6 May 2015

Over Union, Castle Windows and Head to Sea

Over Union :- This image is looking North up a section of the Grand Union Canal as it passes through Milton Keynes (in Buckinghamshire) and shows several narrowboats tied up alongside the tow paths. It was shot from Bridge 88 which is near the Peartree Lodge Waterside and Peartree Bridge Inn by Milton Keynes Marina.



Castle Windows :- I had to wait a little while in order to get this shot. When people weren't in the way the clouds had shifted and were blocking the light coming through the left hand window and when the light was just right people thought it was a good idea to simply stand in my shot and gawp. Anyway, after several patience testing minutes it all came together and this was the result. They don't look like much from this side but if you saw the windows from outside you'd realise exactly where I was standing. This is an interior shot of one of the main rooms of the ruined medieval moated manor house known as Scotney Old Castle in Kent, England. It is said to have been built circa 1378-80 by Roger Ashburnham on an estate owned by Lambert de Scoteni. Over several centuries it was occupied and used until a new house was built further up the hill in 1843 and the castle was then partially dismantled, left to ruin and used as a garden feature (the Victorians were mad about garden features and ruins). Scotney Old Castle and house belong to the National Trust (http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/scotney-castle/).



Head to Sea :- Breathtaking, stunning and a little unnerving. This was as close as I was going to venture in order to get the shot. The camera was on the tripod and I was virtually lying down as standing up didn't seem like a great or valid option. So what do we see here then? Well, the large white chalk cliff in the foreground is part of Seaford Head and just beyond that you can see the houses and beach (as it curves around) of Seaford itself. The headland jutting out is that of Newhaven (the old fort and coastguard lookout sits on top) and that's just by the entrance to Newhaven Harbour. You can (when viewed large or zoomed in) then just make out the cliffs as they roll West towards Telscombe, Saltdean and Rottingdean and very faintly right in the distance like some long grey mark lurks Brighton Marina. This area is part of a nature reserve that runs from Seaford Head to Beachy Head and it's marked as a Site of Special Scientific Interest, designated for its outstanding biological and geological feature. Some of the pathways take you quite close to the edge and the area is known to be one where cliff falls and erosion often take place.



All Photography Copyright © Justin Hill